"HK Cinema in the 1930s: Docility, Social Hygiene, Pleasure-seeking & the Consolidation of the Film Industry"

"HK Cinema in the 1930s: Docility, Social Hygiene, Pleasure-seeking & the Consolidation of the Film Industry" in Screening the Past (an electronic refereed journal on film and media arts published in Australia), issue #11. Officially Upload on November 1, 2000

Abstract

The final blossoming of Hong Kong’s film industry in the 1930s was nurtured by the multiple histories of regional folk culture, anti-colonial resistance, urban growth, and the evolution of leisure/pleasure facilities in the domain of the everyday. The new film arena of the 1930s was marked by the Hong Kong-British administration’s reconciliatory politics, the Chinese capitalists’ expansionist marketing activities, and the Chinese cultural elites' call for progressive, patriotic and moral cultural expression. What resulted was the sinicization of the public sphere, a space for leisure/pleasure, where the everyday person could consolidate a local identity both Hong Kong and Cantonese.

Full text: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/screeningthepast/firstrelease/fr1100/llfr11h.htm